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    We need the world to see and hear that our industry supports transformation. That our industry supports FAIR compensation that INCLUDES actor royalties.

    We need you to record a video message and put it on your online presence! Facebook, Instagram, Twitter. We need all our voices out there under one banner so that when SAGA delivers this message to Parliament, it is a message from all of us.

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All about Acting

Part of SAGA's mission is to uphold the excellence and harness the passion of the performance industry. Whether you're interested in acting tips, casting guidelines and etiquette, advice on how to manage your finances or a guiding hand while reading your contract, we plan have something for everyone.

If you have useful advice or a perspective on acting and actors, why not tell us about it for consideration in our blog! Your insightful opinions will increase your profile in the industry. We will make sure you get all the credit. Views expressed on this blog are the responsibility of the individual correspondents and do not reflect the official position of SAGA, unless otherwise specified.

Nudity, intimacy and simulated sex have an role to play in performance art, but performers and productions teams are vulnerable when engaged in hyper-exposed work.

The SA Guild of Actors has been working with several other industry bodies on standards and protocols that provide a framework for working with intimacy during pre-production, on-set and post-production. These policies provide a safety net for performers while allowing for a more efficient production.

Film-making is a complex collaborative endeavour. But did you know that there’s another player in the game?

Hugh Melamdowitz, partner at Spoor & Fisher explains the ins and outs of creative rights in the film industry. IP rights shape each stage of the film-maker’s journey, from script to screen. They help producers to attract the funds and enable directors, screenwriters, actors and technicians to earn a living. IP-related agreements that can arise in the process of film-making are as varied as they are numerous.

Submissions by the South African Guild of Actors to Government Notice Number R1591 dated 11 December, 2019 entitled: "Intention to Deem Persons in the Film and Television Industry as Employees for provisions of some parts of the BCEA and LRA". The best solution for actors is for there to be a sectoral determination for the Audio-visual and Live Performance industry that considers the peculiarities and intricacies of the sector. This sectoral determination would allow for a more robust and exact regulations for the sector so that the intended protections of labour legislation can be afforded to them.

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought with it the requirement for a new work protocol to mitigate the impact of the virus on the country and its people.

The attached protocol guidelines to the film and television production sector in respect of providing a safe workplace and to minimize the risk of COVID-19 while working in the screen sector. These guidelines are subject to revision and amendment from time to time.

  1. Actors checklist for productions still shooting:
  2. Recommendations for studios still in production
  3. Procedures at work
  4. Example protection plan

The measures proposed in the minister’s statement are based on the announcement by the president on 15 March 2020 which declared a National State of Disaster.

The Copyright Amendment Bill and the Performers Protection Amendment Bill ensure that actors will never again be forced to sign away all their rights. It is essential that this power imbalance is confronted and addressed through legislative reforms.

South Africa and other countries are currently considering proposals to convert from a “fair dealing” to a “fair use” user rights system. Some critics of the change fill their arguments with hyperbole without describing the facts about what is really at stake.

Through various channels, SAGA has been lobbying government and the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to effect changes to the existing Performers Protection Act, which dates back to 1967 and which fails to protect the rights of actors in today’s environment.

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